Playing Rating: Intermediate

Example 1

This lick begins with double stops emphasising F# (the natural 6 of A Dorian), the sliding motion is typical of Gibbons as is the palm muting which interjects the phrases creating dynamics and lending a certain funkiness. This example combines the A Dorian and A minor pentatonic scale. Gibbons moves between Dorian and minor pentatonic effortlessly and a great example of this can be heard on the track Shiek from the album Tres Hombres.

Example 1

Example 2

Here is another example where the A Dorian is combined with the A minor pentatonic with particular emphasis on the natural 6 of A Dorian (F#). The rake before the phrase beginning on beat 3 of bar 1 is another technique Gibbons uses well and is followed by some more palm muting with a fast bend up to the #4 within beat 3 of bar 2 momentarily implying the blues scale progressing in minor pentatonic fashion to the last bar where the F# is employed again ending with the Dorian sound.

Example 2

Example 3

In this example the first bar is made up of the A Blues scale with the E on beat 1 descending to Eb (b5/#4) and then D and C followed by two bends in succession; the first one shouldn’t prove to be too difficult, but the second bend on beat 3 should be bent up using your first finger, ouch! This is because the second bend follows immediately and there’s not much time to use another finger without loosing the flow of the phrase. Hendrix used this technique of bending up with the first finger, and incidentally commented favourably on Gibbons playing when Gibbons played with The Moving Sidewalks back in the late 1960s.

Example 3