Playing Rating: Advanced

Example 1

In this example the #4 is added to the minor pentatonic, this is essentially a blues scale. The picking is very fast and although you have probably heard this said many times before, start slowly with no mistakes and build up to speed. It is important that the fingers of the left hand are in exact coordination with the right hand picking when playing a fast lick like this one. This lick demonstrates a linear approach to the blues scale and requires you to stretch out the fingers in the left hand as opposed to the box playing style.

Example 1

Example 2

Here is an ascending hammer-on and pull-off lick whereby the left hand fingers are stretched out again.

Example 2

Example 3

Gilbert sometimes combines the #4 and natural 6 with the minor pentatonic creating a kind of Dorian Blues scale (without the presence of the 9th). The cool thing about this is that on close analysis you will find an A diminished arpeggio, which can become a C,Eb, or Gb diminished. Among the notes within this example there is a descending F#/Gb diminished 7 arpeggio that begins on the 5th demi-semi quaver on beat 2.

Example 3

Example 4

Another fast picking lick using the #4 again. There is a pattern here which is repeated but because of the number of notes in relation to the time value and time signature the repeated phrase beginning at the 7th demi-semi quaver on beat 2 gives a kind of overlapping sound, the momentary implication is 7/16 over 4/4. For sheer audaciousness in this area of playing check out the solo for Street Lethal.

Example 4

Example 5

This example is straight ahead minor pentatonic ascending in sextuplet groupings. The pattern is digital whereby each subsequent group of sextuplets begins a fourth above the previous one. This type of lick is used to great effect in the Technical Difficulties solo from the Technical Difficulties Racer X album.

Example 5

Example 6

The digital pattern in example 5 is repeated here in a descending fashion.

Example 6